Friday, July 3, 2009

Sausage

My husband was craving sausage the other day, and was disappointed when I said I couldn't eat it. So I decided to conduct an investigative search to find out for sure. There are sausages that are minimally processed and contain no msg or nitrates. This I already knew, but I was delighted to find that they can now be purchased in any local supermarket, not just in health food stores. The problem is, these sausages still likely contain tyramine due to the spices they contain. If you are at a point in your diet where it can be liberalized, and you are really craving sausage, have some of the minimally processed natural sausage. Just remember that in the beginning, strict adherence to the diet is essential. Or, if you need to cook a dish containing sausage for a get together, use this sausage and enjoy the dish with your friends. My point is, enjoy, just don't go overboard. Best wishes on your migraine-free journey.

10 comments:

  1. Could you possibly share brand names, or are you talking about fresh product?

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  2. Hi Bill. The sausage that comes directly to mind is Jimmy Dean's all-natural sausage. It is minimally processed and has no artificial flavors or ingredients. You can find it in most grocery stores.

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  3. What are the spices that are high in tyramine?

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  4. What about no nitrate/nitrite/MSG added (other than those naturaly occuring) bacon? Hormel naturals has one and so does applegate farms?

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  5. I'm talking about foods being flavored with onion. I like Hormel's products better because they are minimally processed. Celery juice is a potential source of MSG, but the products are MUCH safer than any other bacon or sausage you can find. I hope that helps.

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  6. Someone told me to look at Trader Joe's products. Maybe try them as well.

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  7. Remember that sausage, bacon, and other fatty processed meats are not good for anyone, especially us, and should be eaten very sparingly. They should not be eaten often, and probably should not be eaten in the beginning stages of the diet unless absolutely necessary. A recent study by the American Heart Association has shown that red meat is not bad for you as many have always assumed. The problem comes when people eat processed red meat. http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.924977v1

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  8. Is malted barley flour a problem? I see that most breads include this in their flour mixtures. Dr. Bucholz listed malted barley as a problem, but did he mean in stuff like beer? I haven't been able to find anything to answer this question on the web. And finding bread without the malted barley flour is difficult...thanks.

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  9. Hi Cindy. Thank you for posting. I answered your question under the discussion heading "A Place to Talk".

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  10. New Diet Taps into Innovative Idea to Help Dieters Get Rid Of 15 Pounds in Just 21 Days!

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